Music


Happy Earthday to Brother Bob Marley, the Trench Town Messiah – Martin P. Felix

2017-02-06

Martin P. Felix

“Nathanael said to him, Can anything good come out of Nazareth? Philip said to him, Come and see‘. — John 1:46.

Like his biblical counterpart, Bob Marley took a socratic approach to unpack that recurring question loaded with upper class prejudice: “Can anything good come out of Trench Town?” and, with Philipian confidence, answered in the affirmative “…everyone see what’s taking place… / Another page in history.” And indeed it is.

Bob Marley was born on this day, February 6, 72 years ago in rural Nine Miles, Saint Ann, Jamaica but later moved to Trench Town where he spent his formative years. Today, Bob Marley is among the world’s most recognized icons, in the honorable company of Jesus Christ of Nazareth, Che Guevara of Rosario, Argentina, and Frida Kalo of Coyoacán, Mexico.  Marley’s music is credited with inspiring numerous independence struggles around the world, providing a sound track of liberation movements and protests, as well as contributing to the personal intellectual development of many world leaders and activists. His artistry and magnetic personality continues to infect millions around the world even after his untimely death 35 years ago.

Bob’s contributions and legacy include his posthumous induction in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, his album “Exodus” having been named Album of the Century by Time Magazine, and his song “One Love” being selected Song of the Millennium by the British Broadcasting Corporation. Marley’s album “Legend” has sold 250,000 copies annually, according to the Nielsen Sound Scan. In 1978, Marley received The United Nations Peace Medal of the Third World. The “Legend” album has surpassed 10 million copies since its release May 8, 1994. That same year, the album received its 10th Platinum Certification. Marley was awarded a Lifetime Achievement Award at the Grammys in 2001. Robert Nester Marley is indeed everliving!

But perhaps the most fitting answer to the question “Can anything good come out of Trench Town?” was the Jamaican government honoring Bob Marley with the country’s highest award, the Order of Merit in 1981.

Clearly among the 20th century’s most prolific writers, philosophers, and charismatic personalities, Bob ‘flew away’ (a la “Rastaman Chant”) on May 11, 1981. This proverbial “stone that the builder refused” is now the global cornerstone of cultural resistance.

“…one man a-walkin’ / And a billion man a-sparkin’ “ – Bob Marley “Rastaman Live Up!”

Martin P. Felix is an editor and regular contributor to BigDrumNation.

 


Vincy Mas in USA Launches with Big Win for New Artiste

New Soca Artiste Wins big During Launch of Vincy Mas in USA

By Maxwell Haywood

Michelle ‘Hibiscus’ Hillocks created history by spectacularly winning both the New Song Competition, and the first ever New Break-out Artiste prize during the tenth staging of the launch of Vincy Mas in the USA. All this sensation took place on Saturday, May 7, 2016, at Bamboo Gardens in Brooklyn, New York, and was organized by Level Vibes, ably led by Ainsley Primus and Caiphas “Super Eyes” Cuffy.

New Song Competition, and the first ever New Break-out Artiste winner Michelle 'Hibiscus' Hillocks (right) receiving trophy from Atiba Williams (left) Vice Chairman of the Cultural Association of Vincentians in the USA

New Song Competition, and the first ever New Break-out Artiste winner Michelle ‘Hibiscus’ Hillocks (right) receiving trophy from Atiba Williams (left) Vice Chairman of the Cultural Association of Vincentians in the USA

After the singing of the national anthem of both the United States and St Vincent and the Grenadines (SVG) and remarks by SVG Consul General Selmon Walters and Minister of Tourism, Sports and Culture Cecil Mckie, 10 artistes competed in the New Song Competition for the Soca Devil Trophy. They included: Shadique ‘Shaddi’ Paul with his song “Soca all year”; Francis ‘Striker’ Brown with “Gimme Piece Ah Dat”; Maxwell ‘Zeagay’ Samuel with “Stop Smoke de Cocaine”; Michelle-Ann ‘Hibiscus’ Hillocks with “Riddim”; Mervyn ‘Bobb MC’ Bobb with “Get off ah me”; Prim Adonna Bascombe with “Kamasutra”; Dennis ‘De Original Honey Boy Bells’ Jackson with “Fire Power”; Kenroy ‘Jakie’ Jack with “We jamming”; and John Dougan” with “Let’s do again”.

At the end of the show, the MCs Hailes Castello and Bennett Straker announced the decision of the judges, in which first place went to Michelle-Ann ‘Hisbiscus’ Hillocks; second place to Kenroy ‘Jakie’ Jack; and third place to Dennis Bowman.

Winners received cash prizes from Level Vibes, and also trophies and a plaque sponsored by newly created Cultural Association of Vincentians in the USA (CAVUSA). Junior “Soca Jones” Jones, Joanne Legair, and Elmo “Magic” Christian served as judges.

vincy-mas

‘Hibiscus’ dethroned last year’s winner Chang- I, who did not appear to defend his title. Performing for the first time at this level of competition, she displayed full confidence in her ability to deliver. From the time Hibiscus hit the stage, it was clear that she was in command and had all intentions of creating a big impact on the judges and audience, which she did in fine style. She made it easy for the judges to select her as the winner.

With a pulsating pace fit for Back Street on Carnival Monday, Hibiscus let the world know the vital function of soca music to Caribbean people. In her song “Riddim”, she highlighted the African foundation of soca, hence it’s rise and role in Caribbean societies. She spotlighted and expressed pride in the wining dance style as a significant part of Caribbean culture. She singled out the power of the soca rhythm as responsible for the wining done by Caribbean people during carnival and in parties.

Hibiscus receives 'New Breakout Artist' plaque from singer/songwriter Cauldric Forbes.

Hibiscus receives ‘New Breakout Artist’ plaque from singer/songwriter Cauldric Forbes.

Born in Arnos Vale, St Vincent and the Grenadines, Hibiscus now resides in Philadelphia. She expressed great delight in her accomplishment of winning the New Song Competition and the New Break-out Artiste prize. “I am totally mesmerized and truly happy. This is the first time I am performing in such a big competition”, she gleefully said.

Hibiscus expressed her deep love for music and explained that her singing talent was discovered at a young age in school and church, and members of her family have been involved in music. Referring to those who have assisted her in her rise as a soca artiste, Hibiscus credited her teachers at Sion Hill Primary School and St Joseph’s Convent School in SVG, Cauldric Forbes as a song writer, and Ainsley Primus.

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She now looks forward to performing her other song on June 4, 2016, during the Dynamite Calypso Tent preliminary judging of SVG National Calypso Monarch Competition for Vincy Mas 2016, to be held at Café Omar in Brooklyn, New York. Lots of attention is now on this upcoming show when the calypsonians in the Vincentian diaspora in North America will deliver their calypso offerings for Vincy Mas 2016.

Vincent ‘Groovy D’ Kennedy, Carlos ‘Rejector’ Providence, and Phill ‘Phill Patch’ Baptiste of the Dynamite Calypso Tent also made guest appearances. They were joined by representatives of the 20th Century Steel Orchestra, DJ Eyes and DJ Lagga.

Maxwell Haywood is a writer and community activist. He is chairperson of the get help writing a dissertation hard St. Vincent and the Grenadines Diaspora Committee of New York Inc.

 


Within Rum and Coca Cola “Gypsy in the Moonlight” book review

biology homework answers Within Rum and Coca Cola

go to link By Duff Mitchell

J.L.F. WaldronL. F.  Waldron’s http://www.ctdesign.it/?dissertation-inaugural http://popyentradas.com/search-english-essays-online/ Gypsy in the Moonlight, with its appeal to thoughts and feelings, is a fine piece of literary work. The author presents a sequence of events in a gently gripping tide of narrative that makes the reader anxious to find out what’s next. The story unfolds around the conflict between a mother and daughter as well as between American sailors and the community exemplified in an ex-policeman.

Gypsy accounts for the American occupation of Trinidad and Tobago, beginning in 1942 with sailors stationed in Trinidad during World War II, as part of America’s mission to prevent Germany from establishing a beachhead in Panama. The novel gets its title as it outlines the dramatic disturbance of colonials going through hard times then having to angrily settle for the cancellation of Carnival, while struggling with the debate on adult suffrage along with the upheaval over the right to collective bargaining of oil and sugar workers.

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Tubal Uriah Butler and Dr Eric Williams

The central character is a fearless and well-rounded ex-policeman, Bonham Mars, who served time on Nelson Island for transgressions in the name of Uriah Butler. Mars is “salt fish”: the kind-a-guy whom Trini would recognize as ‘ go a man about town http://studioecosam.it/e-business-plan-example/ ‘.  He is ‘Trini to the bone’.  He knows Tom, Dick and Harry… not to mention Peter, James and John … as well as Jean, Dinah, Rosita and Clementina. Yet, whenever the need arises he can employ important tactics copied from stick fighters. He lives in East Dry River on the doorsteps of the womb of the embryonic tamboo bamboo and the birth place of the steel pan, as well as, overlooking the St Ann’s River where Park and Picadilly streets meet at the eastern gateway to the centre of the city of Port of Spain. He revels in calypso. He engages in triumphant conflict with and over the best and the worst of what those days of the American presence offered to all walks of life of the people of Trinidad and Tobago. Moreover, Mars provides Waldron with the opportunity to employ his baton of delectable dialogue to conduct a pleasurable treat in a symphony of verbal and physical dramatics while describing Mars’ encounters with four special women in the plot.

I find it mind blowing that Waldron, a relatively young man, could immerse himself in history in the making–as I witnessed it while growing up in Belmont, Duke Street and in Laventille–and craft his fiction with almost flawless accuracy and consummate intuition. Indeed, Waldron’s panoramic encapsulation of the drama of life experience in a colonial Caribbean territory during the nineteen forties exposes him as the proverbial ‘man in the moon click here .  

British and American servicemen in Port-of-Spain during World War II.

British and American servicemen in Port-of-Spain during World War II.

Gypsy beams light upon the dark days of the condescending presence of the Americans in particular and brightens the path from quelle est la difference entre viagra et levitra  Atilla’s outcry against ”blue eyed babies to mind “ along with http://www.socio.msu.ru/?college-admissions-counselor-cover-letter college admissions counselor cover letter Lord Invader’sRum and Coca Cola” lament over the degrading socio-economic power of the http://www.mikasafarmington.com/how-to-write-an-application-letter-501c3/ Yankee Dollar  and someone write my paper Lord Kitchiner’s “You can’t support me on calypso” leading through argumentative essay about online games Mighty Terror’sBrown skin gurl/ stay home and mind baby” to the exhaling leap, almost two decades later, that ushers http://buyafranchiseinfo.com/dissertation-credit-risk-management/ dissertation credit risk management The Mighty Sparrow’s front and center pronouncement over the plight of “ http://komporbioenergi.com/?p=c-homework-help Jean and Dinah”. In other words, page Gypsy in the Moonlight invites our attention to a keenness of the mind’s eye gaining fodder for the calypsonian’s expression of derision even for Hitler’s mustache and disdain for Mussolini’s tyrannically wild aggression. In addition, in an extendedly lighter linguistic sense, this book pregnant as it is with our idioms and lingo, footnotes the making a research proposal Mighty Conqueror’s ditty contending that, “Webster shoulda come to Trinidad to complete he dictionary.”  To state it simply: I have no doubt that Proofreading Mba Application Essay Gypsy in the Moonlight ensures calypso its rightful place in world literature.

Waldron succeeds in sustaining our interest as he uncovers a gloomy period of our mid-twentieth century history by tapping into our sensory experiences with his employment of images of things heard, things smelled, things seen, things touched and things tasted.

'March in the rain' to demand the return of Chaguaramas to the people of Trinidad and Tobago [1960].

March in the rain to demand the return of Chaguaramas to the people of Trinidad and Tobago [1960].

Mars undertakes, pro bono, to find out for his deceptively prim and proper church going neighbor, Ms Marcella Fournier, the whereabouts of her brilliant and decent convent-girl granddaughter Bethany. Marcella complains that her daughter Henrietta – a notorious prostitute – ushers Bethany into prostitution as well.

Mars sets out to find Bethany by getting a heads up from both Ms. Milly, boss of the clip joint named The Fig Leaf, and from Sgt. Mac Shain at police Head Quarters. Mars wends his way to seek out the voluptuous prostitute “Tess” at the Scarlet Ibis Club located in Yankee territory down Point Cumana. Incidentally, it is here he gets a surprising glimpse of the Ivy Nevins girl whose fate depicts itself on the cover of this book.

When Mars, now in darkness with an oily smelling bag over his bumpy head catches himself, he is prisoner discerning three distinct voices of the sailors getting the better of him in the roadside melee.  He consequently determines to catch corbeau alive: “I must play dead in order to keep the hooligan sailors in the dark instead”.  With almost unbelievable heroism Mars eventually returns home and gets rather much  more than private attention in the ensuing days from (of all persons) his “Angel of Mercy”(an old firestick) Staff Nurse Dawn. As soon as he’s well enough, “after touching base wid de boys by de rum shop, Mars is secretly back on the extremely significant trail that leads to the mountain side of the north coastal Maracas Valley.map

At every turn of events in the plot, Waldron vividly stages the scene in which the action takes place with careful positioning of the characters in relation to the inanimate objects and often against the background of the prevailing weather conditions. His barking dogs are a symbol of trouble in the making while the tamboo bamboo drums excite the warm intensity of the development of the plot itself. Waldron skillfully takes us through the brew of complications surrounding relationships–real or imagined – whereas the narrative tapers off into the soliloquy of Mars’ voicing the surprising resolution of what appears to be a distillation of the idea that, according to James Breedie in his classical religious fiction titled Tobias and the Angel: “the fancies of a woman are bound by no law”.

here unnamed I Could Help Rose Tyler With Her Homework Quote Duff Mitchell is a go site  retired graduate teacher, writer and self-taught literary critic.


I Was Once Afraid of Black Stalin – Richard Grant

Stalin first came to my attention when I was a high school student in Jamaica. My friends and I marveled at his ability to command the attention of an entire nation.  We understood that everyone listened to him very carefully, and reacted immediately to his words. So, when we heard about the Black Stalin, we were terrified because there was no doubt that a Black Trinidadian dictator would definitely be crueler than his European counterpart. Although I was still young, I was fully aware of the rivalry, and was confident Jamaica could not be outdone, because soon we would have our own Black Stalin, by necessity ‘badder’ than that of Trinidad’s. What was to become of us? I so much resented our love for, and adoption of, foreign things.

Cry of the Caribbean

What a relief it was to hear these words, “Ah living in a yes man society/Where all the no man becomes de enemy”, because it was clear then, that we would not experience another lie of the Dictatorship of the Proletariat. The Black Stalin would never betray the people’s interest: a commanding leader, for life.  And that was good. He has ruled benevolently since, with a band of steel.

One of the slogans of the Stalinist era in the Soviet Union regarding the creative Jazz musician was: “Today, he is playing jazz; tomorrow, he will betray the country!” It was the freedom implicit in jazz improvisation that so much irked the Soviets. It is the same freedom of expression and creativity that is demanded by Black Stalin and is employed in the lyrics to “bun dem”: nothing less than fire and brimstone as punishment for local and foreign politicians who as hypocritical parasites leech the economic and cultural blood of Trinidad and Jamaica alike. He condemned the cruel and disingenuous policy of Constructive Engagement, by the USA and Britain that supported the Apartheid regime of South Africa. His benevolence was never extended to them.

His relationship with John public is opposite to that of his European namesake. He constantly has demanded a “New Portrait of Trinidad”, almost as ruthlessly as Stalin promised a new society in the Soviet Union…

“When a man say we not what we used to be

Doh care how much it hurt, but we must agree

From ’65 to now we are no more great

Our country has vastly deteriorate.”

stalin

good essay writing service The Village

I stayed in the “village” of San Fernando when I attended Carnival in 1989. I didn’t see Stalin in performance. I didn’t see him in the street. It is fitting though, that the first that I saw him was at the famous, now defunct Village Gate night club in NYC, located in the heart of the Village section of Manhattan: a community of the hip and the avant-garde, the cosmopolitan and the urbane. At the Gate I heard: Hugh Masakela trumpeting the destruction of the walls of Apartheid; Ruben Blades lyrically denouncing Latin American dictatorships; Stanley Turrentine’s straight-ahead tenor sax blues sound lamenting the African American experience in picking Jim Crow’s cotton as well as celebrating Jim’s eventual lynching; and Dizzy Gillespie, bebop innovator.

Dr Leroy Caliste

I can’t think of a more appropriately named club for me to have witnessed Black Stalin in performance for the first time . The Village Gate becomes the metaphor for communities throughout the Caribbean where the Calypsonians and storytellers inform and pass on our tradition. They also create new critical portraits of our societies’ potential and remind everyone about the politician: the higher the monkey climbs, the more is exposed. It is where the Calypsonian still resides; where the field worker brings home a small harvest of bananas and sugar cane: where the only honest politician on the island returns home at dusk to the house of his birth, to the wisdom of his aging father who remembers when Ciprani statue was placed in the heart of town, and why. Black Stalin was born in San Fernando and still resides there. He does not own a Dacha on the Black Sea.

The man that I thought that I would have reason to fear, when I was a school boy, was as extraordinary as he performed The Caribbean Man. It was really the Black Stalin. My boyhood concerns raced back to mind: the realization of who he was, and who he wasn’t. I carefully examined the surroundings to confirm that it was neither a Potemkin village nor a Caribbean village, in spite of the presence of friends.

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In my village, liming by a friend’s gate into the wee hours of the morning, debating and analyzing domestic politics, politicians’ domestic affairs, as well as international events, all often colored by the perspective of the Calypsonian, was a rite of passage. The yard’s gate became a portal of knowledge about politics, history, romance and cricket. Stalin and CLR James took us beyond our boundaries of provincialism. “What do they know of cricket who only cricket know?”

RG3

It is ironic that as a proud heir of the  rivalry between Jamaica and Trinidad that resulted in a failed attempt at A West Indian Federation, that Black Stalin’s contribution to my formative political years is so significant. The reality of the five times calypso monarch’s transforming influence on my nationalistic Jamaican pride is authentication of the universality of his appeal. In effect he helped to create a federation of like-minded critics of Caribbean society.

The Black Stalin: he came, he saw, he conquered.

©Richard Grant

essay writing jobs Richard Grant is a freelance writer.


​RIP Phife Dawg “Trini Gladiator”

A Tribe Called Quest [ATCQ] is known for their optimistic, socially conscious brand of rap. Like with many other dynamic bands, we sometimes miss the tall standing trees amidst a group’s overall vibrant ecosystem. So when the news reached my family of the death of Malik Boyce Taylor, aka Phife Dawg, I reflected on Phife the person, his family, and what ATCQ would have been absent of this Trini yute from Queens.

Phife Dawg

The son of highly acclaimed Trinidadian American poet Cheryl Boyce Taylor, Malik Isaac Boyce Taylor was born in New York City on November 20, 1970. Phife, like so many playas in the early history of hip-hop – Dougie Fresh, Kool Herc, Slick Rick, KRS-One, Q-Tip, Busta Rhymes, among countless – is from a Caribbean immigrant family.  Phife consciously infused Caribbean aesthetics in his music. On the track “Oh My God”, Phife chimes in “Trini gladiator, anti-hesitater/Shaheed push the fader from here to Grenada…”
A known skeptic of the music industry, Phife gives credits to where he knows it’s due. On “Jazz (We’ve Got)”, his first album as a member of ATCQ [Low End Theory (1991)] he quipped: “To Jah I give thanks, collect my banks, listen to Shabba Ranks.” And on the track “Ham and Eggs”, the funky diabetic brags about his undying love of good Caribbean cuisine “I get the roti and the soursop/Sit back, relax, listen to some hip hop.” Pfife has had life-long struggles with diabetes the complications of which he succumbed to on March 22.
In a facebook message to friends and family, Cheryl Taylor announced the sad news: “Family, my heart is shattered at the loss of my beautiful son. Thank you for your love and good wishes. Malik made me so proud, and he was a good and humble son. What holds me is that he brought joy through his music and sports, and that he lived a magical life. He is with his beloved grandmother and his twin brother Mikal today. God bless you Malik Boyce Taylor. Please send prayers to my daughter-in-law Deisha.”
Attesting to the invaluable contributions of ATCQ, there is a petition currently circulating to rename a section of Linden Boulevard (Queens, New York) Tribe Called Quest Boulevard. Linden Boulevard was one of Pfife’s ‘blocks’ and a setting on Tribe’s track “Steve Biko (Stir It Up)” from Midnight Marauders (1993).
RIP Pfife Dawg Malik Isaac Taylor (November 20, 1970 – March 22, 2016). Peace… Keep rippin’ de mike.

©Martin Felix


Carnival Documentary Premieres in Brooklyn

http://www.nbinflatables.com/thorstein-veblen-essays-in-our-changing-order/ thorstein veblen essays in our changing order Caribbean Awareness Committee (NY) Presents:

help on dissertation green marketing “Our Soul Turned 

Inside Out!” 

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Our Soul Turned Inside Out,” a documentary film that examines traditional Carnival characters created in the 19th century crucible of slavery and emancipation and the psychic impulses behind them, will have its New York premiere on Friday, October 30, 7 pm at Medgar Evers College auditorium, 1650 Bedford Av. Brooklyn. Literature Review Service Delivery  

The film, which runs approximately one hour, focuses on traditional carnival characters – the Pierrot Granade, blue devils, stick-fighters and jab jabs – highlighting the depth of conflict, physical and verbal aggression, inherent in these contested cultural forms. The film connects Trinidad and Tobago’s mas to the J’ouvert traditions of Haiti and Grenada and explains the changes over time in the psychic imagination of mas and why these practices persist.

The film, produced by the Carnival Institute of Trinidad and Tobago (CITT), directed by Mary-Ann Brailey, written by noted filmmaker Dr. Kim Johnson, was well-received at the September 2015 T&T Film Festival. This special screening is being presented by the Caribbean Awareness Committee in conjunction with the Medgar Evers College Film & Culture Series and theCITT.

Roger Toussaint, former president of the Transport Workers Union Local 100 and a member of the Caribbean Awareness Committee, said: “At a time when there is a kind of degeneration of some of our of deep-seated cultural traditions, it’s comforting to know that the CITT and the filmmaker are focused on recapturing and unsilencing the true spirit of  carnival…. This film goes a long way in documenting and celebrating cultural retention and the sometimes hidden connections between working class communities exhibited in traditional mas.”

The film’s screening comes at a very critical moment as the J’ouvert celebrations and the Brooklyn Carnival are under severe attack by hostile forces committed to silencing and marginalizing the Caribbean community which has been a mainstay of Brooklyn’s cultural landscape for the last forty-six-plus years.

The Medgar Evers screening will be followed by a Q & A session around the survivability of traditional carnival in the Caribbean and NY with a panel comprising Dr. Kim Johnson, Director of the Carnival Institute of T&T and Roland Guy, ole mas player in the Brooklyn Carnival since its inception and winner of WIADCA Ole Mas and J’ouvert International Competitions, with Toussaint moderating. Admission to this screening is free and open to the general public.

The film’s trailer may be accessed at: https://vimeo.com/137292175

For further information contact Caribbean Awareness Committee at: Caribbeanawarenesscommittee@aol.com or call 718-532-6347

 

 

 


THE MORANT BAY REBELLION: OCTOBER 11, 1865

http://experts24hr.com/?p=do-all-homework THE MORANT BAY REBELLION: OCTOBER 11, 1865

War down a Monkland!

War down a Morant!

Morant Bay War - Artist Conception (Artist unknown)

Morant Bay War – Artist Conception
(Artist unknown)

The two lines from a Jamaican folk song [cited above] recall the “war” – the so-called “Morant Bay Rebellion” which opened on 11 October 1865.

The rebellion came just three decades following the Abolition of Slavery in Jamaica and the British West Indies. The Abolition brought an end to chattel slavery and inaugurated “wage slavery”. The Jamaican people sought “full free”; the island’s colonial Governor Edward John Eyre and his British overlords in London were militantly opposed.

The Colonial Administration was very well- armed , and their fire was used to “quell” the resistance: hundreds were killed, many more jailed.

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George William Gordan

And Jamaica’s colonial courts hanged George William Gordon [1820-1865], Paul Bogle [1822-1865] and dozens more. Independent Jamaica has elevated the two men to the status of “National Hero”.

Paul Bogle

Paul Bogle

The Morant Rebellion inspired reggae band Third World to compose “1865” aka “96 Degrees in the Shade” [1977], an anthem that recalls the bloody event.

Listen…….
“96 Degrees” – Third World

The Morant Rebellion is also commemorated in the Jamaican novelist V.S. Reid’s “New Day” , first published in 1946.

There exits many more literary salutes to the heroes of the rebellion.

The Rebellion [and its savage repression] caught world attention and Governor Eyre was recalled.

Jamaican novelist V.S. Reid's “New Day”

Jamaican novelist V.S. Reid’s “New Day”

Eyre’s recall was opposed by many: novelist Charles Dickens, for instance, was among the governor’s supporters.

thomas-carlyle

Thomas Carlyle “Occasional Discourse on the Nigger Question”

Historian Thomas Carlyle was a “strident” supporter of the governor. Carlyle’s support is robust and racist in his 1849 essay entitled “Occasional Discourse on the Nigger Question.”

Jamaica’s Morant Bay action reminds of Grenada’s “Laborers March” on Sauteurs of January 11, 1848. Both actions were responses to colonial oppression.

 

 

 

Caldwell Taylor
October 11, 2015

BIGDRUM…..beating out our stories.


Producer Dalton Narine’s Black Stalin Moment

Producer Dalton Narine’s Black Stalin Moment 

By Dalton Narine

2011-02-12-1-1_B_DR_STALIN_5I was working on the Mac several weeks ago when an email from a friend in Cayman [Islands] flew in.

The pride of pan in Point Fortin, Jah Roots. Photo: TONY HOWELL

The pride of pan in Point Fortin, Jah Roots.
Photo: TONY HOWELL
Black Stalin: “Roots play a lot of Black Stalin music.”

“Pan on D Avenue Live on TV,” it said. So I clicked the link, and the remainder of the night enthralled me like no other in recent memory.

Each band played two songs, one of choice and a Black Stalin composition. So I figured the pan-affair was a huge hug and big-up to the resident bard.

Well, I took it all in till 1.30 a.m., and though the band’s songs engaged me, Stal’s repertoire made such an impression that I wondered why steel bands brushed aside foresight and plain loyalty all these years in their search for hip-swinging Jouvert music to carry the day.

Stalin on Pan is a Bomb, really. It took Pan on D Avenue to vet that. The music that night and [Unplugged] sit side by side as schooled entertainment in the pantheon of patois culture.

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best resume writing services in houston professional dscn0190-aDalton Narine, a retired features editor for The Miami Herald, is a producer/director of films about mas and Pan. They include multiple-award winner, Mas Man a film about the artistry of Peter Minshall, King Carnival, Streets of Color, and Masquerade, among others. 


Black Stalin: Unplugged… [a birthday tribute]

Big Drum Nation joins Winthrop Holder in celebrating the intellectual and artistic genius of brother Stalin. We encourage you to share your unique Stalin moment. [BDN editors]

 

Black Stalin: Unplugged…

by Winthrop R. Holder

 

follow link “I sing for the people… I sing any place but… Just don’t tell me what not to sing.” enter site   – Black Stalin

 

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Few of our contemporary artistes and thinkers capture, reflect, and challenge the sensibilities of our time like Black Stalin. While his calypsos have penetrated our spheres of existence, his spoken words, which are equally inventive and biting, have not been as celebrated. In paying tribute to this Caribbean icon on his 74th birthday, we offer a snapshot of his unfiltered and uncensored thoughts.

“My soul frets in the shadow of [the colonizer’s] language.” James Joyce

In Black Stalin: Kaisonian, Louis Regis sketches a portrait of the young Leroy Calliste immersed in listening/conversation with a coterie of African-conscious, indigenous scholars/elders, who were Garveyites and Butlerites. So from early the young man, who later emerged as the Black Man, would also fret about the ravages of Empire. Bothered by our “acquired speech” he posits:

“Ah mean we get licks to learn English. So we speech is resistance language. How we talking and what the brother in Guadeloupe or Martinique talking, when you look at it is the same thing: Two Africans don’t want to talk the colonizers’ language so he end up talking patois and we end up talking something that’s sounding like English…. ‘Ah, eh-eh, Whey yuh say dey?’ That language is the key to kaiso. We have to hope that the world could see our experiences through our language. The moment it cyar happen that way, we in problems, because we wouldn’t be ourselves…. The whole world had to learn what IRE means…. Kaiso is the anthem that things run on. That’s we riddim, we everything!”

Indeed, Stalin’s spoken words anticipated fellow Caribbean poet and cultural theorist Kamau Braithwaite’s “nation language”.

black_stalin

Upending the educational thought police, Stalin asserts: “I see my role in kaiso as educator more than the entertainer… I maintain that Kaiso must always be used to say something meaningful… and [challenge] the powerfluff antics of the downpressors and vampires.”

About one of his ageless classics, the Black Man explains: “In my composition I always get a vehicle to carry the subject….When we look at Bun Dem, the subject is people who have committed crimes against Africa and Africans at home and abroad…. In the song all are stripped of their titles, so I didn’t say Queen Victoria or Queen Mary… she became that woman mary. This was done to express outrage against all perpetrators of injustice against Africans… The history books paint a different picture… my role as educator is to correct distortions.”

And, in speaking about the timeless character of his work, the Black Man explains: “I look for a topic that’s …for both now and down the road.  [W]hatever I write, the man out there is always part of it… This is why in my writing the ‘we’ and ‘them’ in my language is important. When I am singing the audience feels is them singing it, because I’m able in my writing to get my brothers and sisters involved in the topic…. Unlike many artists who sing to the audience, I sing with the audience…. Like ‘Black Man Feeling to Party’ wasn’t Stalin singing to anybody in the audience. The entire audience was involved…. After that song, people meet me and tell me that is years they never went out with they wife, but since that song they went out.”

No doubt, Black Stalin is one of our most inventive thinkers and one who re-interprets and contests our past and the cant of our ‘irresponsible elite’ in order for us to refashioning our futures.  Little wonder, then, that in honoring him in 2008, The Emancipation Committee (T&T) saluted him thus: “[T]o define oneself as ‘The Black Man’ is a statement of ontological significance, a declaration not of art, or politics, but of being.”

Today, as The Black Man recuperates in his San Fernando home, we hear echoes of his, “We can make it….” as he’s surrounded by an institution which he cherishes and has celebrated in song–Family.  NUFF Respect Black Man!

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http://www.progress-plongee.fr/function-help-homework-piecewise/ Winthrop R. Holder

A New York City educator, Holder has written extensively on Caribbean cultural pedagogy and on the philosophy of Black Stalin. He is author of Classroom Calypso: Giving Voices to the Voiceless (Peter Lang International Academic Publishers, 2007).