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We salute the women of Grenada who work towards progress, development and equality — Jacqueline Mckenzie

March 8 is celebrated globally as International Women’s Day (IWD). Originally organized by the Socialist Party of America, the celebrations first took place in February 1909 and were called International Working Women’s Day.  Big Drum Nation is commemorating the occasion by posting women’s reflections on the struggle for equality.
Every year the celebrations embrace a special theme reflecting the urgency of the moment. This year, proceeding from the World Economic Forum’s prediction that the gender gap is unlikely to close entirely until 2186, the theme addresses this unacceptable state of gender inequity as a human rights urgency. Big Drum Nation joins IWD in the campaign to #BeBoldForChange following up on last year’s Pledge for Parity Campaign. It is a quest for women and girls to achieve their ambitions, challenge conscious and unconscious gender bias, push for gender balanced leadership, value women’s equality, encourage inclusive flexible cultures, and for more gender inclusiveness.
We asked Jacqueline Mckenzie  what International Women’s Day means to her. Here’s her response:
Odysseus Hero Essay “On this International Women’s Day we salute and celebrate with the women of Grenada who work towards progress, development and equality. We salute the farmers and agricultural workers; the road workers, cleaners, hotel and house workers; the home makers; the teachers and educators; the nurses and doctors; the engineers, architects, builders and innovators; the activists, campaigners and champions of human rights; the artists, musicians, writers, craft workers and preservers of culture and heritage; the environmentalists; the leaders and public officials who safeguard our people and our land; the wealth creators who respect the rights of workers and the brave trade unionists who won’t bow; the survivors of abuse and domestic violence; the mothers who create, nurture and provide despite…; the young women and girls who hold their heads up high despite…; the women of Grenada who today might cry, smile, sigh, kiss their teeth, struggle, explain, console, believe, love, be fearful, be hopeful; the beautiful Grenadian woman, protector of our nation and guarantor of our future.”
Jacqueline McKenzie is a UK based lawyer specializing in migration, asylum and refugee law. She lectures in migration law and is the founder of the Organization of Migration Advice and Research which works pro bono with refugees and women who have been trafficked to the UK. Jacqueline was born in England of Grenadian and Jamaican parentage and lived in Grenada between 1975 and 1981 attending St Joseph’s Convent and the Institute for Further Education. Jacqueline is passionate about Grenada and is also a founding member of the Grenada Development Network.

 


Women’s Rights are Human Rights — Keisha-Gaye Anderson

March 8 is celebrated globally as International Women’s Day (IWD). Originally organized by the Socialist Party of America, the celebrations first took place in February 1909 and were called International Working Women’s Day.  Big Drum Nation is commemorating the occasion by posting women’s reflections on the struggle for equality.
Every year the celebrations embrace a special theme reflecting the urgency of the moment. This year, proceeding from the World Economic Forum’s prediction that the gender gap is unlikely to close entirely until 2186, the theme addresses this unacceptable state of gender inequity as a human rights urgency. Big Drum Nation joins IWD in the campaign to #BeBoldForChange following up on last year’s Pledge for Parity Campaign. It is a quest for women and girls to achieve their ambitions, challenge conscious and unconscious gender bias, push for gender balanced leadership, value women’s equality, encourage inclusive flexible cultures, and for more gender inclusiveness.
We asked Jamaican-born poet and writer Keisha-Gaye Anderson  what International Women’s Day means to her. Here’s her response:
“It is important that this day is earmarked to call attention to women’s issues worldwide. We are witnessing a very important shift in the movement for women’s equality, with the recent women’s marches all over the globe and organized efforts to push against legislation that would further marginalize women or dictate what they should/should not do with their bodies. Never before have we seen such broad awareness and acceptance of the notion that women’s rights are human rights. And given our interconnectedness via media and the internet, I see this movement only growing. In a sense, I liken this to humanity balancing itself to ensure it has a future on this planet. Under patriarchy, women everywhere have suffered so much, for so long, that injustices are calling out to be redressed. Genius is eager to be unleashed. Different ways of organizing society are ready to come to the fore. Human beings as a species cannot thrive while forcefully suppressing more than half of its population. In facing the necessary challenge of bringing about equality for women, may we all reach a higher, healing level of awareness with which to view our world, and each other.”

Essay Online Friends Keisha-Gaye Anderson is a Jamaican-born poet and creative writer living in Brooklyn, NY. She is the author of the poetry collection Gathering the Waters (Jamii Publishing, December 2014), which was accepted into the Poets House Library. Her writing has been published in a number of national literary journals, literary magazines and anthologies, including Writing the Caribbean, Renaissance Noire, The Killens Review of Arts and Letters, Mosaic Literary Magazine, African Voices Magazine, Streetnotes: Cross Cultural Poetics, Caribbean in Transit Arts Journal, The Mom Egg Review and othersShe is a past participant of the VONA Voices and Callaloo Creative Writing workshops, and was named a fellow by the North Country Institute for Writers of Color. Keisha has also been short listed for the Small Axe Literary Competition. She is a founding poet with Poets for Ayiti. Proceeds from their 2010 chapbook, For the Crowns of Your Heads, helped to rebuild Bibliotheque du Soleil, a library razed during the earthquake in Haiti. She holds an M.F.A. in Creative Writing from The City College, CUNY and regularly leads writing workshops on CUNY campuses. Learn more about Keisha at www.keishagaye.com or at facebook.com/keishagayeanderson. Follow her on Twitter @KeishaGaye1 and Instragram @keishagayeanderson.

You can listen to some of her poems on Soundcloud

“Mask” – Keisha-Gaye Anderson

Calypso and Canada’s Sir Charles – Caldwell Taylor

Calypso is divine spirit and minor goddess in Greek mythology. She has a golden singing voice and, indeed, her vocal prowess imprisoned  the great Odysseus on the island of Ogygia.

You hear voice!

Sir Charles George Douglas Roberts

Many, many, many, many years later the presumptive Father of Canadian poetry, Sir Charles George Douglas Roberts (1860-1936), came  to Trinidad where he asserted that the real origin of the Caribbean song form known as calypso  came from the Greek islands.
And the deathless Spoiler jump up and he bawl:“Ah wan to fall”.
CT



“East of Flatbush, North of Love” by Danielle Brown, Ph.D.

A Review by Jeff Hercules

If one word were acceptable as a review of Dr. Danielle Brown’s East of Flatbush, North of Love; http://multiele.net/division-word-problems-homework/ Division Word Problems Homework An Ethnography of Home, the word would be, Paid For Writing Articles ‘Wow!

All that would be left is for me to Professional Dissertation explain my review.

It’s not often I read a book that speaks as if it were a replay of aspects of my life: This book does that.

It’s not everyday I realize a book has information that would have made me a more knowledgeable student in school: This book would have done that.

It’s also not everyday I identify with an author to the extent I feel flashes of kindred spirit, if kindred spirits can flash that is.

Do not be fooled by the number of pages this author takes to tell her story. Writing experts say take as many pages as you need. However, the 180 pages Dr. Brown takes to tell the tale of what she calls a, “few snippets of my life”, is deceptive. Her travels, the stops she makes along the way — both in real time and through time — along with the nuggets of information she provides would take anyone trying to summarize it all at least twice as many pages.

This book, the first of its kind from anyone as far as I am aware, chronicles aspects of her life in Brooklyn NY once born to, and raised by her immigrant Trinidadian parents.

In the spirit of it taking a village to raise a child, her early influences include more than what were Trinidadian. In fact, she would have been a centipede for her feet to be in all the worlds into which she was born. In the book, she focuses on the culture and heritage of the world of her parents and family members back in Trinidad and Tobago.

Parang Musicians Serenading

To label Dr. Brown a Trini who just happened to be born in Brooklyn would be superficial if not meaningless in its simplicity. From her book, it is obvious she knows more about her genealogy than the average Trinbagonian knows about theirs. She also knows more about the history of the country than its average citizen. Include me in both groups. I now know that along with not paranging the wrong house, parranderos’ song selection is based on where they are in the serenade. 

By the end of the book, I felt I knew Dr. Brown. Not all her experiences growing up in Brooklyn were my experiences growing up decades earlier in Trinidad and Tobago but, cut tails link us. My generation being closer to that of her parents made for some interesting reactions as I absorbed the book. Should I look at her sternly for fidgeting in church or, should I nod, thinking, Education Dissertation Research Help “yes, dem services real long, ent?”

She uses over 100 musical pieces, mostly calypso and Soca, cueing up a different selection to set the tone and mood for a different section of her story. You want to set the scene for Assignment Writing Service Singapore ,  Part II: Of Ghosts and Obeah? Kitchener has Viagra Over The Counter Countries Love in the Cemetery and Sparrow, Obeah Wedding.

Labor Day Carnival 2014, Brooklyn, New York

But, with music being her forte, she includes enough non-Trini music to show her breadth. If Kitchener predates you and Sparrow is but a bird, you will be happy when she cues up Draze for her lament about the effects of gentrification.

Yes, I would argue 100 plus cues in 180 pages shows both depth and breadth of someone whose musical research has focused on parang.

Dr. Brown identifies what is important by how much time she spends on that topic: Religion is important. Family is important. Culture is important. Self is important.

I am still debating when would have been better to know her story was as she described — snippets of her life; Mba Admissions Essays before or Research Paper On Life Insurance after she told it. Would I have had my initial struggle to align with the book’s style if I had had known that buy Alien Skin Exposure 5 before? In the end, it may be of little importance.

Dr. Danielle Brown reading from her book, “East of Flatbush, North of Love”

All the book’s footnotes? Dr. Brown had been steeped in academia. Still, I enjoyed the reference to The Andrew Sisters and Rum and Coca Cola. I had waited for an opening to dispute reference to Morey Amsterdam and ownership of the song only to have Dr. Brown neutralize my planned counterpunch by recognizing Lord Invader in the mini scandal over the song.

Read the book for details.

The snippets of her life she had shared did not slake my thirst so I sought out more information about Dr. Brown. Now I know my membership in the Trinidad and Tobago diaspora meant I was targeted for reading her book. She said as much before realizing how wide a net she wanted to cast for readers. In her amended view, anyone who could read should read the book.

When I searched local Trini newspapers online using the book’s title, I did not get any hits. Not good.

So, to go along with my early, Viagra Cause Priapism ‘Wow!, of approval, let me add this: If you are part of the  Caribbean diaspora you Writ My Paper Write My Paper should read this book.

If you are part of the Trinidad and Tobago diaspora you http://www.arch.pw.edu.pl/?birkbeck-postgraduate-dissertation-proposal Birkbeck Postgraduate Dissertation Proposal have to read this book. Everyone else is invited.

Jeff Hercules blogs weekly on all things Trini at www.trinispeak.com. He has begun pulling his various writing projects into one location: Visit www.jeffhercules.com for that.


Independence and Nation-Making – Caldwell Taylor

 

 Independence and Nation-Making

 by Caldwell Taylor

A Nation is the ecstatic electricity that inhabits May Fortune’s* voice

Big Drum dance

A Nation is the healing thunder of Sugar Adams’ * drum
A Nation is a concert of comforting conceits
A Nation is  the repository of our dreams
And a Nation is the insurgent sea that lifts our boats
our nets 
our hopes 
our heroes 
our sheroes.
 
A Nation is a site and sight of struggle, a thing calypsonian “Black Wizard” noted:
If you want to get rid of Babylon and build a just Nation
You’ve got to struggle on and on…..”
* May Fortune (1909-1973)
*Furgueson “Sugar”  Adams (1890-1983)  
Buy Research Report Caldwell Taylor is a former Grenada diplomat and editor of Big Drum Nation.

February 7, 2016

19th October, 1983: As the crows fly above…

AL ROUGIER on OCTOBER 15, 2016

As the crows fly above, the sun re-emerges after the light drizzle that moistened the bodies of the protesting crowd. Their bodies glistening with the mixture of sweat and raindrops, and pure adrenalineIMG_20160924_054117.jpg.

At this point, Maurice is surrounded by his comrades, in the Operations Room where major decisions are being made. There is a mixture of adults and youths, young and old alike, male and female, supporters and new supporters. With this deadly cocktail of people where values and ethics differ, comes the deadly decision made by his populace who hijacked his leadership, to fight the powerful and ideological military regime. His political chairmanship has been hijacked and has taken a course that is not of his own choosing—though, a few minutes later, he will pay for their choices.

Before the volley of gunfire ruptures the chanting demonstrators on the fort, the correspondence between Fort Rupert and Fort Frederick is heating up. The desire for vengeance, power, and thirst for blood is manifesting. At this point, the intention is set and there is no turning back. He must die. It is now or never—and they chose now.

No one expected the events that followed—the lining up of Maurice and his cabinet ministers along the walls of Fort Rupert, this relic of a colonial past. Its stones hardened with blood and memory of years gone by, of lives deceased, and the effects of weather patterns and the salty air of the Caribbean Sea. It will soon be accessorized with the ricocheted bullets of highly powerful automatic rifles, blood, bone fragments, brain matter and, ruptured flesh. The volley of gunfire will now become the official soundtrack to the terror and fear of 19th October, 1983.

And just like that, the tiny tri-island state of Grenada, Carriacou and Petit Martinique has become world news. This moment will forever leave ripples and shrapnel in the lives of Grenadians near and far. To this day, the metal fragments from that day are logged in the minds, bodies, and the soul of a nation.

 

wall againt which they were line up.JPGLong live these names: Andy Sebastian Alexander, Nelson Steele, Simon Alexander, Vince Noel and Avis Ferguson (two of the first to die), Alleyne Romain, Eric Dumont and Gemma Belmar–this list includes “students, laborers, union leaders, New Jewel Movement members” (Puri 2014: 90). The PRA members killed that day, including Dorset Peters, are: Raphael Mason, Conrad Mayers, Martin Simon, Franklyn James and Glen Nathan. The ministers lined up and killed: Jacqueline Creft, Evelyn Bullen, Fitzroy Bain, Norris Bain, Unison Whiteman, Keith Hayling, Evelyn Maitland and Maurice Bishop.
road they were led.JPG

For the past nine years I have been carrying the memory of Fort Rupert with me. I did not live through it, I was born a month later. I actively started doing research on the events of 19th October, 1983 earlier this year with the simple hope of finding answers and closure for myself and hopefully for the grieving family members.  It has been a challenge. It has been rewarding. It has been complicated. It has been frightening. It has been cathartic. As I pay homage to the lives loss on that fateful day, I bid them all farewell. I must leave them here.IMG_20161009_111338483.jpg

InSongs of Blood and Sword, Fatima Bhutto, in describing the political climate of Pakistan and the violence that has persisted since its birth, hauntingly writes, “It has been a trial writing this book about my family. Through letters and notebooks, photographs and interviews, it has opened them up to me and made them, all my ghosts, whole. But by virtue of what I now know about them, I must close them off. I must take my leave and remove myself from their shadows, their glories, their mistakes and their violent, extraordinary lives. There is just one member I cannot leave behind, Papa. I started this book with the intention of making my peace with my father, of finally honouring my last promise to him—to tell his story—and then, to finally say goodbye. But I can’t. He especially became whole to me, flawed and ordinarily human, unlike the immortal being I revered as a child growing up. His choices, remarkable and dangerous, honourable and foolish, are not mine but I lived them. I have also lived, since his death, with an incomplete picture of my father as a murdered man—holding vigil for him daily in my thoughts, in my steps and travels, in my public moments and in my eyes blinking him in every morning and closing him off to sleep every night. I had forgotten, in these fourteen years, that he was once alive and, for a brief while, only mine. He seems very alive to me now. It is too sweet a thought to push aside, so I delay the thought of farewells, if only for a little while longer” (437). Unlike Fatima, I bid the dead farewell.IMG_8060.JPG


Come Celebrate 10th Anniversary of NYC Transit Strike this Saturday at MEC

twu-feature[1]This coming weekend marks a decade since the City of New York was brought to a standstill as a result of the first Citywide Transit Strike in 25 years. The strike started on Dec 20th, 2005 and lasted for 3 days.41L+NSgdboL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_[1]

A program marking the 10th Anniversary of the Dec 2005 NYC Transit Strike is being held on http://www.callforassistance.com/?how-to-build-resume How To Build Resume Sat. Dec 19th from 2pm to 6pm.

The program is free to the public and will be held in the ‘Founders Auditorium’ at Medgar Evers College, CUNY, located at 1650 Bedford Ave in Brooklyn (Between Crown St and Montgomery St).

The program is supported by the Medgar Evers College Department of Public Administration and is sponsored by a working committee of Transit workers, Community organizations, Activists, and experts from the Legal and Academic communities.

45CC4697-5056-A174-19672572D9664B7F_mid[1]The program features displays, videos, slides about this historic 2005 strike. It includes a keynote address by Roger Toussaint, who led Transit workers during their strike and presentations from Journalists, Commentators, Legal and Academic experts as well as Social Justice Organizers from the Black Lives Matter and Domestic Workers Movements.

Take the IRT #2,3,4 or 5 train to Franklin Ave. The Bldg is two blocks from Empire Blvd.

Parking is also available in the rear of 1650 Bedford Ave.


Honey, dat is a Sweet Victory

pure-honey

The loss of bee-loved forage habitats and the reckless use of new generations of “pesticides”UK Honey Award have combined to bring havoc to bee populations all around the world. Grenada is at the head of the fight to save the world’s bees. In fact, Grenadians Dr. Valma Jessamy and Mr. Jerry Edwin, have won the 2015 Medal of Ukraine, a world-recognized distinction of excellence in the business.

Read more: http://www.jessamine-eden.com/newsevents.html